Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Don't Trust DAILYBIBLE.ME

It must cost some serious money to advertise on YouTube. I'm seeing ads for all sorts of things and one of them was Duvamis. Howver, I never thought I'd see an advertisement for an app you can download for free so you can read the Bible more often.

But, it's true
Hey, it's not like you can go to the Google Play store and download an app that sends you Bible verses everyday!

Oh, wait. You can and they are some of the most popular free downloads.

So, why go through all the trouble and expense of advertising a product that is already available?

I was immediately suspicious when I heard the narrator's voice: the exact same person narrating the video for the malware-infected app from Phenotrack!

I have no way to know if dailybible.me has malware in their app, too. But, given Phenotrack's known track record of not approving or outright deleting comments that even mention the malware, it wouldn't surprise me if dailybible.me had similar issues and they also wouldn't allow anyone to mention it on their comments sections.

My suspicions only deepened when I learned that dailybible.me is an anonymously-registered website, just like phenotrack.com and both sites use the same servers.

But, why were these apps even made?

Well, if the goal was the distribute malware and steal information off people's computers, they've found good targets.

People who believe in the paranormal would really love a one-stop location to keep up on stuff like that and Phenotrack would seem like a dream come true. Bible readers (usually evangelical Protestants) could be quite likely to want an app that helps them read the Bible more. While they might already have such an app on their phone, they might still give dailybible a try to see if they like it better.

Given Phenotrack's past behavior and the obvious link between the two, I advise against downloading the app from dailybible.me until all issues are settled.

Better yet, just ignore them entirely. There are plenty of free apps already available that aren't infected with malware.


Duane Browning
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